Setting up video conferences is made simple with Highfive.

Highfive video conferencing is, “a reimagined meeting room experience built for organizations with multiple offices and remote workers, partners and customers,” says Chris Heinemann, Highfive’s senior director of corporate marketing. 

Highfive’s premium service is equipped with a 4k HDR Dolby Camera and a high-fidelity audio microphone powered by Dolby Voice. With a CPU built into the camera, setup is easy and requires customers to place the camera on top of the television or on a wall mount.  
Setup takes less than 15 minutes, and joining a meeting is even easier with no downloads, PINS, or 1-800 numbers required.  

“IT teams love Highfive’s uniquely modern hardware-as-a-service model that combines meeting room hardware and software that’s inexpensive, easy to deploy and requires nearly zero maintenance and support,” Heinemann says. 

The system comes with screen sharing capabilities, intelligent scene framing, dual-screen functionality, and SIP interoperability to join meetings hosted by other service providers.

The atmosphere at relaxed Avondale neighborhood eatery Pisolino may remind you of a charming, laid-back European bistro—and for good reason.

Chef and co-owner James De Marte spent over a decade cooking his way through Italy to craft and hone the skills on full display at the cozy restaurant today. “The restaurant is truly his dream-turned-reality and a showcase of his love for Italian cuisine,” says co-owner Rachel De Marte.

 

There’s no better way to build team spirit than with a can of spray paint and a blank canvas. Native 312 Events gives groups a chance to foster community and creativity while learning about one of Chicago’s most widely seen forms of art: graffiti.

Javier Dominguez and Adam Dittman founded Native 312 Events nearly two years ago after working together on events for more than eight years. They now provide Urban Art Workshops to a variety of clientele, including collegiate groups and corporate teams.

 

For professional speakers, engaging with an audience can begin months before stepping out onto the stage. 

Their first audience interaction might come through a teaser video in an event promotion email, says professional speaker and author David Fisher. Or they might also begin cross promoting the event on social media, according to Rich Gibbons, president of SpeakInc., a company that books event speakers and headline entertainers.