Planner's Pocket Dictionary: What Are Your Credentials?

  • Planner's Pocket Dictionary: What Are Your Credentials?

    Tear this page out and stash it in your back pocket for easy future reference.

     
    FROM THE Spring 2018 ISSUE
     

For something so pervasive and prestigious, planner’s designations can be pretty mysterious. We dig into what each acronym means and where they come from so you know the next time you see them, and might be inspired to add them to your title as well.

CAE: Certified Association Executives, accredited by the American Society of Association Executives, have taken classes in Essential Practices in Association Management, Effectively Managing Volunteer Committees and Task Forces, Membership Development, Communication and Public Relations and Developing Your Leadership Potential. The courses are offered at ASAE in Washington, D.C., twice a year.  

CCEP: To become a Certified Conferences and Events Professional, planners must work at a qualified college or university and have a membership with the Association of Collegiate Conference and Events Directors-International. After applying, planners work through a virtual curriculum and receive an engraved plaque upon completion. 

CDME: Certified Destination Management Executives must complete a newly redesigned program sponsored by Destinations International (formerly DMAI). This designation is considered the highest honor in destination management planning. 

CEM: In order to display the Certified in Exhibition Management credentials, planners must have at least three years experience and complete a rigorous educational program designed by the International Association of Exhibits and Events. 

CFE: If you know a lot of facilities executives, you may frequently see the Certified Facilities Executive designation. This acronym indicates expertise in venue management as determined by the International Association of Venue Managers. 

CGMP: Planners and suppliers who work with and for the government have the opportunity to go through a course designed to increase knowledge and awareness of these types of events. The Society of Government Professionals offers this seven-part course to planners with at least one year of relevant experience. 

CME/H: The Healthcare Convention and Exhibitors Association created the Certified for Manager of Exhibits and Healthcare designation for those who are interested in earning the “The Seal of Professional Excellence of the Healthcare Exhibit & Event Industry.”

CMM: This acronym, designating Certified Meeting Managers, comes from Meeting Planners International (MPI) and Global Business Travel Association (GBTA), after completing courses taught by business professors. 

CMP: Those with a CMP designation are Certified Meeting Professional as determined by the Convention Industry Council. To earn the designation, planners apply through the CIC and must then pass a written exam.

CPCE: If a colleague has this acronym trailing their name, it means they are a Certified Professional in Catering and Events, as accredited by the National Association for Catering and Events. 

CSEP: This designation dates back to 1993 and indicates a Certified Special Events Professional as accredited by The International Live Events Association. 

DMCP: Destination Management Certified Professionals have applied for certification through the Association of Destination Management Executives International.

Summertime in Chicago means it’s time to break out the chilly desserts. We tapped Starr Nordgren, also known as @chicagofoodiegirl to her 33,000 Instagram followers, to pick fi ve delicious ice cream treats to add to menus this season.  

PARLOR PIZZA BAR’S ICE CREAM TACOS

Executive chef Jaysen Euler has become an Instagram sensation with his “Tacolato,” a waffle-shell dessert taco. The Cookie Monster and Unicorn Dreams flavors are the most popular. 

BOMBOBAR’S COOLER CHOCOLATE

 

The annual Sweets & Snacks Expo is like Disneyland for snack lovers like me. Held every May at McCormick Place in Chicago, this three-day event draws more than 18,000 candy and snack professionals from around the country to connect with exhibitors purveying the latest and greatest in these categories. I attended this year, armed with lots of hand sanitizer (for use in between handshakes and sampling) and a giant tote bag to collect the latest products to take home for tasting.

 

Gain insight from a professional who increased room block bookings by 30 percent over three years.