• Hotel Allegro Debuted Renovated Event Space

     
    POSTED July 31, 2014
     

Kimpton’s Hotel Allegro, a contemporary 483-room boutique-style hotel in the heart of Chicago’s loop art and theater district, is revealing the renovations of two new events spaces—Crescendo and the Green Room. The redesign was an opportunity for the hotel to take under-utilized space and transform it into unique and fresh options for meetings and events. Part one of a two phase renovation, Crescendo and the Green Room will be accompanied by renovations to the hotel’s living room in early 2015 as part of phase two.

The new design, led by the award-winning Simeone Deary Design Group, was inspired by the feeling of splendor and grandeur of the theater experience. Celebrating the movement and whimsical rhythms associated with music and art, the design concept is also a nod to the hotel’s namesake, tying in the meaning of the term “allegro” which refers to the tempo of music.

“The redesign has infused a breath of fresh air into the hotel giving our guests a more inviting and warm ambiance to take advantage of for business meetings and social events,” said Mary Perino-Fleming, hotel manager of Hotel Allegro.

Crescendo, situated at the top of the entryway, is aptly named and designed to reflect the height of excitement and energy of a musical score. A short trip up the grand staircase takes guests to a room filled with glittering chandeliers, story-telling artwork ascending the focal wall and large-scale feathers on the ceiling. Sleek seating and polished décor keep the area elegant and modern. Although considered a branch of the living room, Crescendo can also be closed off for a completely private event of up to 18 guests, like private dining or cocktail receptions.

Continuing up the grand staircase, guests reach the Green Room. Directly above Crescendo is a room characterized by a slower tempo of music. The 2,884-square-foot meeting and event space is treated as an extension of the hotel’s premier event venue, the Walnut Room. Accentuating the harmony of architectural detail reminiscent of the original time period of the building, coffered ceilings, a grid-like custom carpet design and anthropomorphic art evoke drama, sophistication and humor throughout the space.

The pre-function area harbors warmth with a fireplace, hardwood floors and French doors. Beyond the large French doors is an ample space for a meeting of up to 170 seated, or 250 for a reception. The space is fully equipped with a state-of-the-art sound system, carpeting and windows. To the left of the large space is a handcrafted rectangular wood table with a modern light fixture overhead as the focal point. This space can be closed off for a smaller meeting of up to 8, or it can be used as an extension of the larger space as an area for food and beverage stations or a gift bag retrieval area.

After almost 20 years of vacancy, the Cook County Hospital in Chicago will be put to use once again. A $150 million adaptive reuse project restored the historic, 106-year-old hospital, which has become a combined Hyatt Place and Hyatt House hotel, as well as medical offices, a museum, a food hall and more. While the opening is multi-phased, the hotels are scheduled to open in late July.  

 

Jumpstarting tourism in cities across the country will be more complicated than simply opening doors again – especially in cities with large populations like Chicago. However, working together proves more effective, and in Chicago, more than 250 businesses are banding together to join Choose Chicago’s new initiative, Tourism & Hospitality Forward. It bolsters a safe reopening that encourages tourism as well as meetings and events in

 

Due to COVID-19, non-essential travel was, or has been, banned for months. Long anticipated trips and in-person gatherings were canceled and people have adjusted to the new normal: staying at home and meeting over Zoom. However, states have been slowly lifting restrictions, and non-essential travel will soon be happening across the country again. However, some may not be as comfortable with the thought of traveling as they were before the pandemic.