• Lisle CVB Helps Local Women Dress for Job Interviews

     
    POSTED November 21, 2014
     
The Lisle Convention & Visitors Bureau is currently holding a woman’s business attire clothing drive, now through Dec. 31. In partnership with Poised for Success, the clothing drive is aiding in the promotion of economic self-sufficiency in women. 
 
“It may seem obvious but the right set of clothes can make or break a job interview,” says Diane Homolka, Lisle CVB executive director. “However, many disadvantaged women just don’t have the means to go out and buy business clothes when they are unemployed. That’s why initiatives like Poised for Success are so important.”
 
This initiative asks donors for suits and other professional attire including, but not limited to, blazers, blouses, skirts, shoes, scarves, jewelry, winter boots, and suit pants. All donations should be gently used, clean and ready for women to wear. It is also important that the clothing be of current style. A collection box will be at Lisle Convention & Visitors Bureau office location- Lisle Village Hall lobby, 925 Burlington Avenue- from October 1 – December 31st. The Lisle CVB will take donations to Poised for Success, 312 S. Westmore/Meyers Rd., Lombard.

Daily life has been significantly altered by COVID-19, no matter the industry. Many are working from home, while children stay inside for online schooling. Meetings and events have been hit especially hard, since the essence of the industry is face-to-face interactions. While we continue to self-isolate, plenty of organizations have been offering webinars with insights on how to handle the pandemic—watching webinars is a great way to use that extra time you might have used for your commute to learn something useful.

 

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.