Musikfest recently unveiled its official 2015 festival artwork, and the results are bright, vibrant and enticing. The work showcases the Lehigh Valley region’s history as well as the festival’s unique past.

Brian Barto, an Emmaus, Pa. native, created the graphic illustration based off of signage found throughout the Lehigh Valley region. He also tied in unique aspects of the festival itself.

“I’ve always had an affinity for old signage that gains it character from a mix of forms, colors, materials and textures,” says Barto. “Given the history of the Lehigh Valley, and the diversity of the crowds, performers and artists who participate in Musikfest, this work of art really seems like a wonderful way to represent the spirit of that entire amalgamation.”

Barto, who currently resides in West Chester, Pa., graduated from Emmaus High School in 1993 and Kutztown University in 1997 with a bachelor’s degree in communication design. He creates artwork by taking discarded and used items and signs and reinterpreting them as regional homages, graphic statements and unique advertising vehicles through a mix of woodworking, painting, illustration and other mediums. He has worked with international brands, regional restaurants, boutiques and more.

The music festival hasn’t commissioned an artist to create its poster artwork since 2005. Barto’s creation will be featured on the Musikfest 2015 website, poster and festival mug, while also used in other merchandise and apparel throughout the year.  

Musikfest, the nation’s largest free music festival, boasts more than 500 performances on 14 stages across Bethlehem, Pa. over 10 days. This year’s 32nd festival will take place Aug. 7–15 

The Hilton Dallas Lincoln Centre completed its $24 million renovation of the entire hotel and conference center. Renovations began in 2020. 

The North Dallas conference center hotel renovation includes a full redesign of all 503 guest rooms, lobby and public areas, and food and beverage outlets. Additionally, the hotel’s 55,000-square-feet of meeting space was updated with new furnishings, technology upgrades, and the addition of a new 6,600-square-foot Lakeside Ballroom. 

 

Anchorage is a city like none other—making it a popular choice for hosting meetings and events.

Through the tall windows of the Dena’ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, meeting attendees can gaze out toward Cook Inlet, which stretches all the way to the Gulf of Alaska and toward mountains—some snow-capped—representing several ranges. They may even see an eagle fly by or see one of the 1,500 moose that are said to roam Alaska’s largest city. It’s easy to see why it’s said that Anchorage is a city like none other in the United States.

 

In early March, Meeting Professionals International released a statement regarding the invasion of Ukraine: 

“In a show of support for the people of Ukraine, MPI will immediately suspend business with all companies in Russia. In addition, any plans to formalize a chapter in Russia will be paused….We remain concerned for the well-being of our community and our MPI members in Russia and Ukraine who were already seeking to climb out of the shadow of this pandemic and are now experiencing these unprecedented challenges.”