• Planners Pocket Dictionary: Raising the Bar at Cocktail Hour

     
    FROM THE Fall 2016 ISSUE
     

    Tear out this one-sheet and stash it in your “back pocket” for future reference.

When it comes to special events, the bar is often one of the main attractions. To help your cocktail hour run as efficiently as possible, it’s important to understand the lingo. We hooked up with Kay Alonge of Jewell Events Catering, who serves up a hi ball of terms you should know.

86 – menu item no longer available

BEHIND THE STICK – slang term for the act of getting behind the bar and bartending

CALL DRINK – drink ordered by naming specific brands of liquor and mixers, i.e. Jack & Coke

CORKAGE – the charge (per bottle) for serving wine brought into an event by a sponsor or client

DEEP – a measure of how busy a bar is; for example, “three-deep” means three guests are waiting to be served

FREE POUR – pouring without a measuring device

FULL BAR – a bar that is fully stocked with standard liquor, mixers and materials (here, the recommended bartender to guest ratio is 1:50)

FULL KEG – also called a half barrel; equivalent to 165 cans of beer (or 6.8 cases)

GOLDEN RATIO – 2:1:1, meaning two drinks per guest per hour HI BALL – a tall drink glass

HOSTED BAR – a bar that serves free drinks to guests, but isn’t necessarily a full or open bar (also referring to sponsored bars)

HOUSE BRAND – any brand of liquor served when a customer requests a drink by its generic name, e.g., gin and tonic or scotch and soda (also known as well brand)

LO BALL – a short drink glass (aka rocks glass)

LUG – crate used to store glassware

NEAT – cocktail style meaning the spirit is served without ice

OPEN BAR – typically a full bar that serves free drinks to guests at an event

PREMIUM – more expensive liquor brands that can typically be found stocked on the top shelf

SANIT – back of house area used to stage dirty glassware and/or catering items during an event (an abbreviation of sanitation)

SOFT BAR – a bar that serves beer and wine only (here, the recommended bartender to guest ratio is 1:75)

SPEED RACK – commonly used bottles placed near the ice well

STANDARD SHOT – 1.25 to 1.5 ounces of a spirit served in a small shot glass

STEMWARE – glassware typically used to serve wine

TWIST – citrus peel that is rimmed along a cocktail, and then twisted and dropped in as a flavorful garnish

UP – spirit stirred with ice and strained into a chilled glass (aka straight-up)

WHEEL – a slice of fruit [usually citrus] cut perpendicular and used as garnish or decoration

Over the years, any corporate event planner can admit to spending countless hours researching the perfect venue or vendors for their gatherings. After attending or hosting hundreds of events, New York-based Daphne Hoppenot was no stranger to this research and was frustrated by its repetitive nature. However, it was planning her wedding in 2018 that pushed her to realize the lack of resources in the corporate events market compared to the wedding industry, and set out to see if other meetings and events professionals were struggling with the same problem.  

 

Freelancing has become a new ball game since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, as many companies cannot afford to keep full-time positions, but still need those tasks completed. Although many more professionals have had to join the freelancing community since March, Tracy Judge had the passion for the freelancing community two years ago–long before the pandemic hit–and founded her company Soundings Connect in order to directly connect meetings and events industry freelancers with customers. 

 

Whether dabbling with an augmented reality app, getting up to speed on the complexities of 5G service or employing cocktail-mixing robots, planners are no strangers to emerging technology. As meetings and events become increasingly tech-driven affairs, we’ve checked in with top event production pros for their takes on the latest event tech trends and what’s to come in the year ahead.